New Menopause Recommendations from the Woman’s Health Initiative

 

New Menopause Recommendations from the Woman’s Health Initiative

 

 

A generation of women have been deprived of menopause hormone therapy (MHT) due to a widely publicized misinterpretation of research. Thousands of women stopped taking MHT after the 2002 Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) report was released claiming that combined conjugated equine estrogen (CEE) and medroxyprogesterone acetate (a progestin), increased the risk of breast cancer. Those findings have since been re-evaluated many times and researchers have come to very different conclusions. It has been determined that MHT is the most effective treatment for managing menopausal vasomotor symptoms and CEE taken alone (in women without a uterus) reduces the risk of breast cancer by 23% while reducing breast cancer death by 40%. That is significant! The only minor concern is for a small increased risk of breast cancer (less than 1 per 1000 annually) in women (with a uterus) taking combined CEE and medroxyprogesterone acetate, but these women have no increased risk of dying from breast cancer.

 

 

 

 

Many women remain reluctant to take MHT due to misinformation released more than 20 years ago from the original WHI research. Of course, no one wants to increase their risk for breast cancer. However, current evidence shows MHT does not increase the risk for breast cancer or breast cancer mortality, even for women with a family history of breast cancer. Encourage patients to speak with their doctor during the menopause transition or soon after to learn if they can benefit from MHT. Women deserve optimal healthcare based on current evidence. This generation of midlife women doesn’t need to suffer as women have in the past and will benefit from knowing the facts. 

 

 

 


Tags

breast health, estrogen, hormone health, hormone therapy, menopause, women's health


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